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#FREE DOWNLOAD Û די עגונה µ Popular E-Book, די עגונה Author Chaim Grade This Is Very Good And Becomes The Main Topic To Read, The Readers Are Very Takjup And Always Take Inspiration From The Contents Of The Book די עגונה, Essay By Chaim Grade. Is Now On Our Website And You Can Download It By Register What Are You Waiting For? Please Read And Make A Refission For You I managed to get a copy of this after it was weeded from our library collection. My first Grade! A beautifullywritten story. Even translated into English, it feels Yiddish to the core. In a time when pogroms against Jews were extremely common, you feel the sense of community and the accompanying struggles of betrayal and desperation among those trapped in the closequarters of a Jewish village. To the world they were just European Jews, but within their world is a diverse, closeknit, and sometimes petty community of villagers held together by a common (yet sometimes very thin) thread.

Grade gives a sad but honest look at early20th century Jewry in postWWI Vilna, Lithuania. It tells the tale of Merle, an agunah (a woman, "chained" by Jewish Law to her husband who disappeared 10 years ago) living in the poor Jewish section of Vilna. Without proof of her husband's death, she cannot receive permission to remarry (in a religious sense). Merle is a kindhearted, strongspirited woman who often lets her principles guide her more than she does religious Law. Out of respect for her religious mother, though, she does not seek to remarry without obtaining permission first. Without the permission, she lives a lonely life, but keeps busy by doing charitable acts for her fellow villagers, and is actually quite content to just help others.

This ultimately heartwrenching tale is told from many different perspectives, and the reader can see how much easier everyone's lives could be if compassion were given in a payitforward kind of way. Although I'm not sure this was Grade's main inention, it definitley makes a case for why love, respect, and compassion for your fellow human beings should ultimately preside even over religious Law. Abolutely marvelous.